Skip to main content

All book club meetings are free and open to the public. Copies of books up for discussion are available for patrons to borrow on a first-come first-served basis at the Ground Floor Checkout Desk. You may also reserve a copy by calling the Information Desk at 978-674-4120. Please have your library card ready.

The Non-Fiction Book Club meets on the first Thursday of every month 6:30-7:30PM.

For more information about the Non-Fiction Book Club, please contact Sean Thibodeau, Coordinator of Community Planning, at sthibodeau@LowellLibrary.org or 978-674-1542.

Upcoming Discussions:

November 5, 2020 – Lawrence In Arabia: War, Deceit, Imperial Folly and the Making of the Modern Middle East by Scott Anderson


The International Book Club meets on the Third Tuesday of every month 6:30-7:30PM.

For more information about the International Book Club, please contact Pam Colt at pcolt@LowellLibrary.org or call 978-674-1536. Please register on the Events page to receive information for Zoom login.

Upcoming Discussions

November 17, 2020 – Eugenie Grandet by Honoré de Balzac


The Short Story Book Club meets on the Last Wednesday of every month 6:30-7:30PM.

For more information about the Short Story Book Club, please contact Bridget Cooley at bcooley@LowellLibrary.org or call 978-674-1548.

Upcoming Discussions

October 28th – please register on the Events page to receive information for Zoom login.

This month’s selection:

Young Goodman Brown by Nathaniel Hawthorne

While we’re on the topic of the most famous short stories ever written, “Young Goodman Brown” sits with the high rollers. Set in 17th-century Puritan New England, Goodman Brown goes to run errands in the woods at night and stumbles upon a terrifying ceremony where he sees himself and his wife undergoing an initiation. He wakes, unsure if the scene was a dream and lives the rest of his life paranoid of people and the community. It’s a big allegory about seeing the evils of human nature and a piece loved by authors like Stephen King and, well, everyone.

Symbols and Signs by Vladimir Nabokov

The famous author of Lolita wrote “Signs and Symbols” in 1948. Its premise is seemingly simple: an elderly couple visits their mentally ill son in the sanatorium in America. Yet their background and trials come into sharp focus as the story develops, until an explosive ending disrupts everyone’s peace of mind.